Simple Solution

Many have never thought about using pure essential oils in their cleaning routines, but as we become increasingly aware as a society of the environmental hazards of chemical pesticides and cleaners, pure essential oils become a natural alternative to enhance our home and lives in a natural, environmentally friendly way.

Start with a box of borax  or bicarbonate of soda available in the detergent section at the grocery store.

To 2-3 cups of borax (Na2B4O7 ·10H2O), add 25 drops of pure essential oil or their mixture. Make sure the drops of oil are crushed well and evenly distributed in the borax. To apply it to the carpet or rug, try shaking it off a large spoon or out of a large can with a shaker lid. An old powder bottle works well.

Put the bicarbonate of soda (NaHCO3) into a polyethene bag, then sprinkle with the essential oil and mix well. Seal the bag tightly and allow the aroma to permeate the soda for at least half an hour before vacuuming. As a bonus, if the dust bag does not need changing immediately, fragrance will waft from the air vent each time you use thwe vacuum cleaner; aromatherapy while you work!

Here are a few fragrant possibilities to transport you from the mundane:

Magic Carpet

  • 10 drops clove (repels clothes moths)
  • 15 drops orange
  • 15 drops lavender

Persian Dream

  • 25 drops cedar wood
  • 10 drops clove
  • 10 drops lemon

Coniferous Forest

  • 25 drops pine
  • 10 drops juniper
  • 10 drops Siberian fir

Disclaimer: UAB “MĖTA” does not warrant and shall have no liability for information provided in this newsletter or on www.eco-meta.com. Each individual person, fabric, or material may react differently to a particular suggested use. It is recommended that before you begin to use any formula, you read the directions carefully and test it first. Should you have any health care-related questions or concerns, please call or see your physician or other health care provider.

Adapted from:

  1. The Essential Oils Book,by Colleen K. Dot (Storey Books, 1996).
  2. The Encyclopedia of Aromatherapy, by Chrissie Wildwood (Healing Arts Press, 1996)